Trends, Patterns and Impact of Migration in Karachi

  • Tahir Iqbal
  • Naila Usman Siddiqui
  • Munazza Madani

Abstract

Abstract Views: 1298

The process of migration has a long history. Migration occurs at international, national and regional levels. There is more trend of migration from rural to urban. Karachi (an international city of Pakistan) is a hub of business, trade and industries. The seaport in the city may have attraction for skilled, semi-skilled and unskilled people. Many people may travel to Karachi for jobs, for business for investment, for better education, and for better health facilities. When people of different cultures move to Karachi and start living, definitely their settlement adds problems in the city. People bring with them their cultural social, historical, and geographical identities. The purpose of study is to find out nature of migration and migrants problems in Karachi. The data was collected by survey 150 respondents (having different ethnic backgrounds), 15 IDIs and 05 FGDs. The content analysis technique is use for qualitative analysis. The analyzed data is in graphs and in description. The study reveals that people migrate to Karachi for jobs, industry; trades, better health and education (pull factors). Poverty, lacks of resources, warfare, natural disasters (push factors) also help move people to Karachi. The migrants are unskilled, semi-skilled and skilled. Most of them have temporary settlement. The migrants’ issues include accommodation, health, security, foods and homesickness. Whatever, it is, migration has enhanced their socio-economic status in their respective relatives and areas. However, there is need to conduct an ethnographic study of migration trends, patterns, nature, and migrants issues. There is also need to locate from, where unskilled semi-skilled and skilled migrant move and which kind of skill they have.

Published
2019-12-21
How to Cite
Iqbal, T., Siddiqui, N. U., & Madani, M. (2019). Trends, Patterns and Impact of Migration in Karachi. Journal of History and Social Sciences, 9(2). https://doi.org/10.46422/jhss.v9i2.82
Section
Articles